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On reading the article published by The Atlantic, "Will School-Discipline Reform Actually Change Anything", my gut reaction is one of strong agreement with those who seek to reform the way students are disciplined for minor infractions in school. As someone with my own personal experience being punished for a seemingly simple violation, I agree with many points raised in the article, such as taking into account the nature of the offense as well as the student's history, as well as integrating it into care and virtue ethics as it is my own opinion that reform would dovetail my own interests with the interests of other students as well as school administrators, in addition to the fact that one misdeed does not warrant such a heavy judgment upon a student's character as was the case with my experience. My personal experience is actually a pretty common one, all the way up until I received my actual punishment. Some friends and I had decided to leave school and go out to grab something to eat, as many students do. We weren't even too worried about getting caught, as many people do get caught and are simply let off with a slap on the wrist, mainly people who are highly ranked within our class. Upon walking back in, we were immediately confronted by a security guard, followed by talking to an administrator and being given the rest of the day in ISS and the next day OSS. It was shocking, as they didn't bother to even take into account our clean records into the decision, as they had done many times with the others who had been caught, even going so far as to deny that other people had been let off when I brought it up. As someone who has been suspended for a first and nonviolent offense, I agree with many of the sentiments expressed in the article. As the third page of the article explains, within the New York City Department of Education, "serious infractions" made up "fewer than 2 percent of reported suspensions in the 2013-14 school year", with "insubordination", a broad and vague term, making up the rest. Under Care Ethics, it would make sense for schools to implement reform in their discipline policies, as both students, like myself, as well as the school system, would benefit from it. Students will be less subject to having suspensions go on their records for minor offenses, and school systems will be benefited by being able to report less instances of suspension and expulsion to the media and public institutions. By combining my own interests, shared by all students, and those of the school systems, I believe that introducing discipline reform in schools is an ethical thing to do according to the definition of care ethics. Similarly, every time a school suspends or expels a student, the administrators responsible are making a judgment about the character of that student. I am not a bad person. However, by being given a suspension, I was lumped into a category of people who typically do receive suspensions, under the subjective judgment of the administrator. Whether conscious or not, when someone is given a punishment designed to be reserved for more serious offenses, they are being equated to that level by the one making the decision, regardless of whether they intend to or not or if the offense is even that serious. By introducing discipline reform, schools would more ethically take into consideration the character of students being punished by way of evaluation of their records and knowledge of them as people before making a disciplinary decision, understanding that one bad choice is not indicative of the type of person that that student is, according to the definition of virtue ethics. As someone who has been put through this process with no prior record, without any sort of evaluation of my record or me as a person, I can safely say that introducing school discipline reform would be an ethical choice, as it takes into consideration a student's character, under virtue ethics, as well as combining the interests of students like myself who don't feel harsh punishments should be given for minor offenses, as well as the interests of school districts that would benefit from a lower rate of suspensions and expulsions.
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The Ethical Choice of Introducing School Discipline Reform
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The Ethical Choice Of Introducing School Discipline Reform

Words: 722    Pages: 3    Paragraphs: 4    Sentences: 19    Read Time: 02:37
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              On reading the article published by The Atlantic, "Will School-Discipline Reform Actually Change Anything", my gut reaction is one of strong agreement with those who seek to reform the way students are disciplined for minor infractions in school. As someone with my own personal experience being punished for a seemingly simple violation, I agree with many points raised in the article, such as taking into account the nature of the offense as well as the student's history, as well as integrating it into care and virtue ethics as it is my own opinion that reform would dovetail my own interests with the interests of other students as well as school administrators, in addition to the fact that one misdeed does not warrant such a heavy judgment upon a student's character as was the case with my experience.
              My personal experience is actually a pretty common one, all the way up until I received my actual punishment. Some friends and I had decided to leave school and go out to grab something to eat, as many students do. We weren't even too worried about getting caught, as many people do get caught and are simply let off with a slap on the wrist, mainly people who are highly ranked within our class. Upon walking back in, we were immediately confronted by a security guard, followed by talking to an administrator and being given the rest of the day in ISS and the next day OSS. It was shocking, as they didn't bother to even take into account our clean records into the decision, as they had done many times with the others who had been caught, even going so far as to deny that other people had been let off when I brought it up. As someone who has been suspended for a first and nonviolent offense, I agree with many of the sentiments expressed in the article. As the third page of the article explains, within the New York City Department of Education, "serious infractions" made up "fewer than 2 percent of reported suspensions in the 2013-14 school year", with "insubordination", a broad and vague term, making up the rest.
             
              Under Care Ethics, it would make sense for schools to implement reform in their discipline policies, as both students, like myself, as well as the school system, would benefit from it. Students will be less subject to having suspensions go on their records for minor offenses, and school systems will be benefited by being able to report less instances of suspension and expulsion to the media and public institutions. By combining my own interests, shared by all students, and those of the school systems, I believe that introducing discipline reform in schools is an ethical thing to do according to the definition of care ethics. Similarly, every time a school suspends or expels a student, the administrators responsible are making a judgment about the character of that student. I am not a bad person. However, by being given a suspension, I was lumped into a category of people who typically do receive suspensions, under the subjective judgment of the administrator. Whether conscious or not, when someone is given a punishment designed to be reserved for more serious offenses, they are being equated to that level by the one making the decision, regardless of whether they intend to or not or if the offense is even that serious. By introducing discipline reform, schools would more ethically take into consideration the character of students being punished by way of evaluation of their records and knowledge of them as people before making a disciplinary decision, understanding that one bad choice is not indicative of the type of person that that student is, according to the definition of virtue ethics.
             
              As someone who has been put through this process with no prior record, without any sort of evaluation of my record or me as a person, I can safely say that introducing school discipline reform would be an ethical choice, as it takes into consideration a student's character, under virtue ethics, as well as combining the interests of students like myself who don't feel harsh punishments should be given for minor offenses, as well as the interests of school districts that would benefit from a lower rate of suspensions and expulsions.
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